“Moving” beatification of Korean martyrs by Pope Francis – Cardinal Tagle

On Saturday morning, Pope Francis celebrated Mass for the Beatification of 124 Korean Martyrs who were killed between 1791 and 1888 because of their Catholic faith

Here’s what Pope Francis said in his homily for the Mass

Pope Francis at the Mass near Gwanghwamun Gate, central Seoul, South Korea on Aug. 15 during the beatification of 124 martyrs who were killed between 1791 and 1888, because of their faith. - screenshot from live stream coverage

Pope Francis at the Mass near Gwanghwamun Gate, central Seoul, South Korea on Aug. 16 during the beatification of 124 Korean martyrs – screenshot from live stream coverage

Among those at the Mass was the Archbishop of Manila, Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle who told Vatican Radio he was  “very much moved [when I realized] we had Asian ancestors here who were willing to pay the cost of being a Christian, and if needed they would offer their lives. This is an inspiration for all of us.”

Some of the thousands of people who came to join the Mass presided Aug. 15 by Pope Francis in Seoul, South Korea during the beatification of 124 Martyrs received common from scores of priests on the ground. - screenshot from live stream

Some of the hundreds of thousands of people who came to the Mass presided Aug. 16 by Pope Francis in Seoul, South Korea during the beatification of 124 Martyrs received communion from priests on the ground. – screenshot from live stream

Listen to Vatican Radio’s interview with Cardinal Tagle:

 

Korean martyrs’ descendants feel pride and burden

Korean martyr Paul Yun Ji-chung screenshot from Catholic Bishops' Conference of Korea's website. http://www.koreanmartyrs.or.kr/sbss124_en_view.php?num=1

Korean martyr Paul Yun Ji-chung screenshot from Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Korea’s website. http://www.koreanmartyrs.or.kr/sbss124_en_view.php?num=1

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — They died well over a century ago, but the 124 Korean Catholic martyrs who will be honored by Pope Francis this week still have a hold over many of their descendants — even some who learned of their sacrifices only in recent years, or whose families are now Buddhist or Protestant.

Read what it’s like to be descendant of a Korean martyr