Happy Lunar New Year of the Sheep, Asian families

Good Shepherd rice mural - NJ Viehland PhotosXuan Loc, VIETNAM – This mural of the Good Shepherd made of rice grains hung in the dining room of the Pastoral Complex of the Diocese of Xuan Loc, in Dong Nai, Vietnam, when the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC) officials gathered there with delegates and resource persons from around east, south, southeast and central Asia on Dec. 2012 for the Xth FABC Plenary Assembly. 

This year’s celebration of Lunar New Year on Feb. 19 pulls the mural photo out of Catholic in Asia’s media library because the Chinese Zodiac sets the date as the start of the Year of the Sheep until Feb. 7, 2016, and sheep is one of the prominent symbols used in the Christian faith.

Some of the earliest depictions of Christ show him as the Good Shepherd. 

At the same time, lamb also represents Christ as sacrifice (Paschal Lamb) and also a symbol for Christians.

As Christ is Shepherd, Peter, as head of the Church, was told to “feed His sheep.”

For example: 

Jesus gave Peter a three-fold command to “feed my sheep” in John 21:15-17. Each time Jesus said, “Feed my sheep,” it was in response to Peter’s three-fold declaration of love for Jesus. 

The three commands, although often translated the same way, are subtly different. The first time Jesus says it, the Greek means literally “pasture (tend) the lambs” (v. 15). The Greek word for “pasture” is in the present tense, denoting a continual action of tending, feeding and caring for animals. Believers are referred to as sheep throughout Scripture. “For he is our God and we are the people of his pasture, the flock under his care” (Psalm 95:7). Jesus is both our Good Shepherd (John 10:11) and the Door of the sheepfold (John 10:9). By describing His people as lambs, He is emphasizing their nature as immature and vulnerable and in need of tending and care.

The second time, the literal meaning is “tend My sheep” (v. 16). In this exchange, Jesus was emphasizing tending the sheep in a supervisory capacity, not only feeding but ruling over them. This expresses the full scope of pastoral oversight, both in Peter’s future and in all those who would follow him in pastoral ministry. Peter follows Jesus’ example and repeats this same Greek word poimaino in his first pastoral letter to the elders of the churches of Asia Minor: “Be shepherds of God’s flock that is under your care, serving as overseers” (1 Peter 5:2).

The third time, the literal translation is “pasture (tend) the sheep” (v. 17). Here Jesus combines the different Greek words to make clear the job of the shepherd of the flock of God. They are to tend, care for, and provide spiritual food for God’s people, from the youngest lambs to the full-grown sheep, in continual action to nourish and care for their souls, bringing them into the fullness of spiritual maturity. The totality of the task set before Peter, and all shepherds, is made clear by Jesus’ three-fold command and the words He chooses.

from http://rosemarieberger.com/2014/11/07/pope-francis-the-holy-people-of-god-living-on-the-peripheries-of-history/

from rosemarieberger.com click photo for full blog post

Pope Francis has also used the symbol of shepherd on various occasions. At his first Chrism Mass in 2013, he used the imagery to stress the need for priests to go out of themselves, reach out to their people in the name of Jesus, and also to allow their people to be media through which Jesus can touch and teach priests.

Pope Francis said:

A priest who seldom goes out of himself, who anoints little – I won’t say “not at all” because, thank God, our people take our oil from us anyway – misses out on the best of our people, on what can stir the depths of his priestly heart. Those who do not go out of themselves, instead of being mediators, gradually become intermediaries, managers. We know the difference: the intermediary, the manager, “has already received his reward”, and since he doesn’t put his own skin and his own heart on the line, he never hears a warm, heartfelt word of thanks. This is precisely the reason why some priests grow dissatisfied, become sad priests, lose heart and become in some sense collectors of antiques or novelties – instead of being shepherds living with “the smell of the sheep”, shepherds in the midst of their flock, fishers of men.

And so it is along these lines of Scripture and Pope Francis’ message to priests that we wish families in and from Asia celebrating Lunar New Year of the Sheep : may prosperity, peace and justice reign in everyone’s lives and in the world through our sacrifices, mercy, compassion and full pastoral care from our Church.

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Vietnam’s new bishop of My Tho acknowledges laity’s role in vibrant Church

Catholic women's groups members prepare to welcome a delegation of the Federation of Asian Bishops' Conferences (FABC) assigned to visit their parish during the Xth FABC Plenary Assembly in Xuan Loc on Dec. 2012. - NJ Viehland Photos

Catholic women’s groups members prepare to welcome a delegation of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC) assigned to visit their parish during the Xth FABC Plenary Assembly in Xuan Loc on Dec. 2012. – NJ Viehland Photos

Newly appointed Vietnamese Bishop of My Tho, Peter Nguyen Van Kham, has acknowledged the need for formation for lay Catholics who he said must play  a “greater role” in the Church.

Laity bring about vibrancy for the life of the Church, Bishop Kham, former Ho Chi Minh diocesan pastoral center director, was quoted saying in a report of Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Before Mass, Vietnamese Catholic youth cheerfully await a delegation of the Federation of Asian Bishops' Conferences (FABC) visiting their parish as part of X FABC Plenary Assembly activities in Dec. 2012. - NJ Viehland Photos

Before Mass, Vietnamese Catholic youth cheerfully await a delegation of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC) visiting their parish as part of X FABC Plenary Assembly activities in Dec. 2012. – NJ Viehland Photos

Bishop Kham reportedly shared this reflection on his ministry in Ho Chi Minh in an email to CNA after Pope Francis appointed the former auxiliary of Ho Chi Minh as bishop of My Tho in the Mekong Delta on July 26.

Read CNA’s full report on Vietnamese bishop joyful to lead, evangelize new flock

My Tho diocese covers the provinces of Long An and Tiền Giang and two thirds of Đồng Tháp province spread across a land area of 9,262 square kilometers, the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Vietnam reported on its website.

As of December 31, 2010, the diocese’s 120,300 Catholics among its total population of 4,776,036 were living in areas within its 85 parishes and 34 subparishes and mission stations. Some  124 priests, 242 religious, 41 seminarians, 10 seminary candidates and 366 catechists serve in the diocese.

Xuan Loc was created in 1965 from places under the pastoral care of Ho Chi Minh City archdiocese. In 2010, more than 35 percent of the 2.34 million people living in the diocese had been baptized Catholics. Today, more than 1,700 women religious are helping in Church ministries diocesan officials say. Many of them contributed to discussions, services and operations in support of the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops' Conferences Dec. 10-16, 2012. (N. J. Viehland Photo)

Many of the thousands of Vietnamese religious women contributed to discussions, services and operations in support of the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences Dec. 10-16, 2012. (N. J. Viehland Photo)

 

AMOR XVI Conference in photos

"A mystic is a prophet in contemplation..." Asia-Oceania Meeting of Religious 16th Conference (AMOR XVI) final statement, Nov. 17, 2013, St. Scholastica's Center of Spirituality, Tagaytay City, Philippines . / By N.J. Viehland

“A mystic is a prophet in contemplation…” Asia-Oceania Meeting of Religious 16th Conference (AMOR XVI) final statement, Nov. 17, 2013, St. Scholastica’s Center of Spirituality, Tagaytay City, Philippines . / By N.J. Viehland

"A prophet is a mystic in action" - AMOR XVI Conference final statement. Participants listened to environmental and human rights activist Sister Stella Matutina, a Filipino Benedictine, share about her work and challenges she faces on Day 5 of the conference that gathered more than 70 nuns and representatives of partner groups in St. Scholastica's Center of Spirituality, NOV. 10-27 , 2013. / By N.J. Viehland

“A prophet is a mystic in action” – AMOR XVI Conference final statement. Participants listened to environmental and human rights activist Sister Stella Matutina, a Filipino Benedictine, share about her work and challenges she faces on Day 5 of the conference that gathered more than 70 nuns and representatives of partner groups in St. Scholastica’s Center of Spirituality, NOV. 10-27 , 2013. / By N.J. Viehland

TAGAYTAY CITY, Philippines – Sixty-five religious women from Asia and Oceania concluded an eight-day conference with a commitment to deepening their spiritual bonds and strengthening cross-cultural and international cooperation to better serve the needy.Held Nov. 10-17 at St. Scholastica’s Center of Spirituality here, the AMOR XVI (Asia-Oceania Meeting of Religious) conference’s theme, “The Mystic-Prophetic Dimension of Religious Life,” led the women to combine their spiritual and prophetic ideals.

[ Read full report here ]

Holy Spirit Sister Eden Panganiban, Chairperson of the Association of Major Religious Superiors of Women in the Philippines welcomed participants and guests to the 16th Conference of Asia-Oceania Meeting of Religious (AMOR XVI) during the opening Mass Nov. 11, 2013 in St. Scholastica's Center of Spirituality, Tagaytay City, Philippines  / NJ Viehland Photos

Holy Spirit Sister Eden Panganiban, Chairperson of the Association of Major Religious Superiors of Women in the Philippines welcomed participants and guests to the 16th Conference of Asia-Oceania Meeting of Religious (AMOR XVI) during the opening Mass Nov. 11, 2013 in St. Scholastica’s Center of Spirituality, Tagaytay City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

AMOR South Asia Postulants NJ Viehland Photos

Nuns of various congregations and territories in Asia and Oceania recited prayer petitions during the opening Mass of AMOR XVI Conference celebrated with Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle of Manila on Nov. 11, 2013 in Tagaytay City, south of Manila. /By N.J. Viehland

Nuns of various congregations and territories in Asia and Oceania recited prayer petitions during the opening Mass of AMOR XVI Conference celebrated with Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle of Manila on Nov. 11, 2013 in Tagaytay City, south of Manila. /By N.J. Viehland

AMOR nuns speak out NJ Viehland Photos

– More photos to come –

Faith of Vietnam Catholics offers bright future for Church – Cardinal Rosales

By N.J. Viehland

Recently appointed Vietnamese Auxiliary Bishop Joseph Dinh Duc Dao of Xuan Loc Diocese, while serving as rector of the diocese’s Saint Joseph Seminary last December addressed delegates and participants of the Xth Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC) Plenary Assembly during a cultural program held in the diocesan pastoral complex.

He expressed gratitude to the FABC  “…for the joy of faith you have brought to us…” and “have inspired in us.”

Bishop Dao told us the presence of so many bishops, priests, religious women and lay Church workers in their country at one time “… opens up our mind and heart to the whole Church of Asia, and reminds us that we have other brothers and sisters who believe in the Lord as we do, scattered in the whole of Asia.” 

The Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC) is an association of conferences of bishops of Catholic Churches in South, Southeast, East and Central Asia. The federation fosters solidarity and joint responsibility for church and society welfare in the region.

The conference includes sixteen Bishops’ Conferences from Bangladesh, East Timor, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea, Laos-Cambodia, Malaysia-Singapore-Brunei, Myanmar, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.

Churches in places where there are no bishops’ conferences have been included as associate members, including Hong Kong, Macau, Mongolia, Nepal, Novosibirsk (Russia), Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan.

FABC gathers in plenary in various countries, and the 2012 assembly was the first to be held in a country under communist rule.

Filipino Cardinal Gaudencio Rosales (in front), Archbishop Emeritus of Manila was welcomed by a drum and bugle corps and a reception line stretching through the main roads of Xuan Loc Pastoral Complex in the diocese east of Ho Chi Minh City on Dec. 11, 2012, after he delivered his address citing Pope Benedict XVI's message to the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops' Conferences (FABC). He is accompanied by Assistant of the Papal Legate Father Marcelino Antonio M. Maralit, Jr. (N.J. Viehland Photo)

Filipino Cardinal Gaudencio Rosales (in front), Archbishop Emeritus of Manila was welcomed by a drum and bugle corps and a reception line stretching through the main roads of Xuan Loc Pastoral Complex in the diocese east of Ho Chi Minh City on Dec. 11, 2012, after he delivered his address citing Pope Benedict XVI’s message to the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC). He is accompanied by Assistant of the Papal Legate Father Marcelino Antonio M. Maralit, Jr. (N.J. Viehland Photo)

Two months after the FABC plenary assembly on Feb. 28, Pope Benedict appointed Monsignor Dao auxiliary bishop for Xuan Loc. He was the last bishop appointed by Benedict XVI before he stepped down as pope.

Bishop Dao said the presence of FABC delegates “… reminds us of our responsibility to share with other brothers and sisters in Asia the joy of faith in Christ.” Less than 3 percent of the population in most countries in Asia are Catholics.

The presence of Filipino Cardinal Gaudencio Rosales as special envoy for then Pope Benedict XVI , along with Archbishop Savio Hon Tai Fai, secretary of the Congregation of the Evangelization of Peoples and Archbishop Leopoldo Girelli, resident representative of the Holy Father to Vietnam “connect us to Rome and the Holy Father, and through the Holy Father with the whole Church,” Bishop Dao said.

He appealed to them, “Please, eminence and excellencies, convey to our beloved Holy Father, our love, our respect and our obedience. Please tell him that he has children here who are faithful to Christ and to the Church.”

In response, Cardinal Rosales promised bishops, priests, religious men and women and lay members of the Vietnam Catholic community gathered for a cultural presentation in the diocesan pastoral complex in Xuan Loc that he would convey their message of faith, love and loyalty to the Church and to Rome.

“I want to tell him (Pope Benedict) when I see him and report to him next month what I have seen, what I have witnessed and felt about what it is really to be Church of Jesus Christ, yes, in the whole of Asia, but in particular here in Vietnam. And I will assure you…I will remind him, ‘Do not forget, your Holiness, that you have children in that part of Asia.'”

Cardinal Rosales said he would tell Pope Benedict “I know you keep them (Vietnam Catholics) in your spirit, in your prayer, in your blessing, but they want me to remind you that you have children there who not only obey the Church, but they love you.”

He said one gift he will give the pope is an embroidery he received from a Vietnam government official during his visit to Hanoi prior to the FABC assembly. “…No less than the minister interpreted it and he said, ‘Look, Your Eminence, there are two islands in a big sea. This is Vietnam, and the other one is the Vatican. All you need is a bridge.”

Cardinal Rosales, however, told hundreds of people attending the cultural program, ” I am going to explain this to the Holy Father: A bridge is about to be built, but I think I saw a boat there. If there is no bridge, there should be a boat. After all, the Holy Father is pontifex. 

In Cardinal Rosales’ view, the FABC experience showed “how bright the future is that God is preparing for Vietnam.”

END

Drumming “future” nuns welcome delegates to the FABC’s 10th plenary assembly in Vietnam

Vietnamese women in formation to be religious sisters welcomed bishops and other delegates and guests to the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC) at Xuan Loc Pastoral Center, east of Ho Chi Minh during opening of formal sessions on Dec. 17, 2012.

Tran Ngoc Khoa captured their fiery performance here

Related stories:

Vietnam Diocese Grateful for “Miracle” of Hosting 10th FABC Plenary Assembly

 

Vietnam Diocese Grateful for “Miracle” of Hosting 10th FABC Plenary Assembly

Vietnam Monsignor Vincent Dang Van Tu, vicar general of Xuan Loc said the diocese’s hosting of the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC) was a wish come true for Xuan Loc officials.

Cardinal John-Baptist Pham Minh Man of Ho Chi Minh broached the idea of hosting the gathering of Church leaders from around Asia four years ago when he inaugurated the buildings in Phase I of the construction plan for the Xuan Loc Pastoral Centre complex east of Ho Chi Minh City.

In an interview on Dec. 14, Monsignor Tu retold the story of the pastoral center that housed more than 100 plenary assembly delegates, staff and guests who were attending meeting and workshop sessions, and praying together during the assembly of bishops of Asia that took place from Dec. 10-16.

Monsignor Vincent Dang Van Tu (right), Vicar General of Xuan Loc diocese of Vietnam told the story of the 6-hectare pastoral complex east of Ho Chi Minh City that hosted the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops' Conferences (FABC) Dec. 10-16,2012. With him is Monsignor Pietro Nguyen Van Tai, assistant of the Papal Legate to the plenary assembly, who translated the priest's Vietnamese remarks into English. Photo by N. J. Viehland

Monsignor Vincent Dang Van Tu (right), Vicar General of Xuan Loc diocese of Vietnam told the story of the 6-hectare pastoral complex east of Ho Chi Minh City that hosted the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC) Dec. 10-16,2012. With him is Monsignor Pietro Nguyen Van Tai, assistant of the Papal Legate to the plenary assembly, who translated the priest’s Vietnamese remarks into English. Photo by N. J. Viehland

Merry Christmas to FABC delegates from Saigon, Chuc Mung Giang Sinh

By: N.J. Viehland

A Catholic volunteer from the Deanery of Peace in Binh An village in Ho Chi Minh archdiocese in his Christmas greetings described the visit of delegates of the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops Conferences (FABC) to his village last  Dec. 15 as “significant.”

Welcoming delegates and guest journalist for the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops' Conferences (FABC) to Binh An deanery, one of the sites selected for the Asian bishops' exposure to local Vietnam Church situations held Dec. 15, 2012. Plenary Assembly activities celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Holy See's approval of FABC's Statutes and examining challenges to the Asian Church took place Dec. 10-16, 2012 in Xuan Loc and around Ho Chi Minh. FABC delegates and participants also proposed responses that included those addressing demands of evangelization in this Year of Faith. Photo from Tien Thuy.

Welcoming delegates and guest journalist for the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC) to Binh An deanery, one of the sites selected for the Asian bishops’ exposure to local Vietnam Church situations held Dec. 15, 2012. Plenary Assembly activities celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Holy See’s approval of FABC’s Statutes and examining challenges to the Asian Church took place Dec. 10-16, 2012 in Xuan Loc and around Ho Chi Minh. FABC delegates and participants also proposed responses that included those addressing demands of evangelization in this Year of Faith. Photo from Tien Thuy.

Tien Thuy in his Christmas greeting emailed Dec. 23 to the FABC’s Binh An exposure group, including bishops from Japan, the Philippines, Timor Leste, south Asia and Vietnam shared pictures of the exposure visit saying the images “captured all significant moments” that day in the deanery.

FABC bishops prepare for Mass with Vietnamese Catholics photo from Tien Thuy

Clergy, religious women, youth, officials of Ho Chi Minh parish pastoral councils, and other Catholics of various sectors welcomed the FABC delegation. One journalist covering Church in Asia for more than two decades accompanied the group.

Some delegates and a guest journalist of the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops' Conferences (FABC) discussed with religious women during a visit to Binh An Deanery on Dec. 15, 2012. Photo from Tien Thuy

Some delegates and a guest journalist of the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC) discussed with religious women during a visit to Binh An Deanery on Dec. 15, 2012. Photo from Tien Thuy

They prayed with the people, who filled the church during the Mass concelebrated by Asian bishops with local clergy, they mingled with the people and posed for photos with them after Mass and dined with local clergy and Catholic officials.

FABC bishops journalist praying in Binh An Vietnam from Tien Thuy

FABC bishops say Mass at Deanery of Peace Binh An

“I hope all of you will not forget and keep in your heart those moments always,” Tien wrote.

His message said:

“May God’s Grace blanket on all of you with happiness and joy in your family and deanery. God will bless everything you do for people in mission through this Christmas season and Wonderful New Year. I hope to see you someday in somewhere.”

A group of bishop delegates and a journalist who visited local Vietnam churches met Catholic leders in the Deanery of Peace in Binh An on Dec. 15, 2012. Photo from Tien Thuy

A group of bishop delegates and a journalist who visited local Vietnam churches met Catholic leders in the Deanery of Peace in Binh An on Dec. 15, 2012. Photo from Tien Thuy

Vietnamese Catholics flock to the church for the Mass concelebrated by local clergy with delegate bishops to the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Catholic Bishops' Conferences (FABC) who visited Ho Chi Minh archdiocese's Deanery of Peace in Binh An village on Dec. 15, 2012. Photo from Tien Thuy

Vietnamese Catholics flock to the church for the Mass concelebrated by local clergy with delegate bishops to the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Catholic Bishops’ Conferences (FABC) who visited Ho Chi Minh archdiocese’s Deanery of Peace in Binh An village on Dec. 15, 2012. Photo from Tien Thuy

Young Vietnamese Catholics welcome Asian bishops and a journalist attending the10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops' Conferences (FABC) to Binh An deanery of Ho Chi Minh archdiocese. The exposure to local Church situations on Dec. 15 was part of the  December 10-16, 2012 plenary assembly. Photo from Tien Thuy.

Young Vietnamese Catholics welcome Asian bishops and a journalist attending the10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences (FABC) to Binh An deanery of Ho Chi Minh archdiocese. The exposure to local Church situations on Dec. 15 was part of the December 10-16, 2012 plenary assembly. Photo from Tien Thuy.

FABC delegates and guest journalist get a view of Vietnam Church's journey in faith during their visit to the Deanery of Peace in Binh An village in Ho Chi Minh archdiocese. The exposure trip was among activities of the 10th FABC Plenary Assembly held in Xuan Loc diocese and Ho Chi Minh from Dec. 10-16. Photo from Tien Thuy

FABC delegates and guest journalist get a view of Vietnam Church’s journey in faith during their visit to the Deanery of Peace in Binh An village in Ho Chi Minh archdiocese. The exposure trip was among activities of the 10th FABC Plenary Assembly held in Xuan Loc diocese and Ho Chi Minh from Dec. 10-16. Photo from Tien Thuy

Bishop delegates of the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops' Conferences shared a meal with clergy and other Catholics of the Deanery of Peace of Ho Chi Minh City archdiocese in Binh An village. Photo from Tien Thuy

Bishop delegates of the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences shared a meal with clergy and other Catholics of the Deanery of Peace of Ho Chi Minh City archdiocese in Binh An village. Photo from Tien Thuy

Bishop delegates and a journalist attending the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops' Conferences in Vietnam Dec. 10-16, 2012 joined a lunch prepared for them by Catholic leaders of Binh An deanery of Ho Chi Minh archdiocese on Dec. 15. Photo from Tien Thuy

Bishop delegates and a journalist attending the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences in Vietnam Dec. 10-16, 2012 joined a lunch prepared for them by Catholic leaders of Binh An deanery of Ho Chi Minh archdiocese on Dec. 15. Photo from Tien Thuy

A group of delegates of the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops' Conferences and a guest journalist met clergy of Binh An Deanery Ho Chi Minh archdiocese ont he second to the last day of the Dec. 10-16 plenary assembly. Photo from Tien Thuy

A group of delegates of the 10th Plenary Assembly of the Federation of Asian Bishops’ Conferences and a guest journalist met clergy of Binh An Deanery Ho Chi Minh archdiocese ont he second to the last day of the Dec. 10-16 plenary assembly. Photo from Tien Thuy

A deanery is a subdivision of a diocese, consisting of a number parishes, over which presides a dean appointed by a bishop. The duty of the dean is to watch over the clergy of the deanery, to see that they fulfill the orders of the bishop, and observe the liturgical and canon laws. He summons the conference of the deanery and presides at it. Periodically he makes a report to the bishop on conditions in the deanery.

Binh An is one of 14 deaneries of Ho Chi Minh.

More to come on the FABC website: Features on 10th FABC plenary assembly and Vietnam local Churches.