What Church means to weary Filipino mothers in Beirut

Lebanon’s holiday revelry contrasts with the difficult daily lives of hotel and household workers from the Philippines.

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Catholic Church Mothering Weary Filipino Mothers in Beirut
BY VICTOR GAETAN

 

Gov’t agency to repatriate workers from ‘tense’ Yemen – OWWA

The Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA) is ready to extend airport assistance to returning OFWs (overseas Filipino workers) from Yemen, who registered for the mandatory repatriation offered by the government as tension escalated in the said country.

“OWWA is part of the Crisis Management Team (CMT) composed of officials from the DFA (Department of Foreign Affairs) and the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE). The CMT continuously monitors the situation of countries experiencing crisis to ensure that our OFWs working there are safe. If immediate action is needed, the CMT automatically activates its committees to respond to the situation,“ OWWA Administrator Rebecca J. Calzado explained.

Calzado disclosed that as of 26 January 2015, there are a total of 2,391 OFWs working in Yemen as nurses, household service workers (HSWs), supervisors, technicians, mechanics, engineers, among others.

The continued occupation of the capital city of Sana’a by Houthi rebels and the recent suspension of many embassies in the Yemeni capital was the basis for the DFA’s heightened alert level.

OWWA appeals to the relatives of OFWs working in Yemen to convince their loved ones to come home to safety. In 2011, OWWA extended assistance to about 1,000 OFWs who returned from Yemen due to the political instability in the said country.

OWWA NEWS RELEASE, Manila, March 3

Cardinal Tagle: Upcoming synod will reflect clear picture of families

Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle of Manila, president of the Synod on the Family, at the June 10 press conference on the 2016 International Eucharistic Congress discussed the synod in his response to National Catholic Reporter's question: What can Catholics who are not allowed to receive the Eucharist hope for in the upcoming synod. - NJ Viehland Photo

Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle of Manila, president of the Synod on the Family, at the June 10 press conference on the 2016 International Eucharistic Congress discussed the synod in his response to National Catholic Reporter’s question: What can Catholics who are not allowed to receive the Eucharist hope for in the upcoming synod. – NJ Viehland Photo

For Philippines Cardinal Luis Tagle, the two stages of the Synod of Bishops on the family that Pope Francis will convene in Rome are “hopeful signs” that the Church is willing to listen not only to the success stories and joys of families, but also to the difficulties families experience worldwide.

At a June 10 press conference in Manila, Cardinal Tagle pointed out various reasons why Filipino spouses separate, some of them because of marital problems, but many others “because of poverty that leads to forced migration.” He described the latter as “separation because they love.” 

Daniel and Evita Licardo (seated) celebrated their silver wedding anniversary with their daughters, relatives and friends grateful for "blessings" they received especially while Daniel was away, working in Kuwait since one year after they were married. - Photo by Noriza Licardo published with permission.

Daniel and Evita Licardo (seated) celebrated their silver wedding anniversary with their daughters, relatives and friends grateful for “blessings” they received especially while Daniel was away, working in Kuwait since one year after they were married. – Photo by Noriza Licardo published with permission.

 

Cardindal Tagle said Pope Francis wants various voices on the matter of separation of spouses to be heard.

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Photo archive – Cardinal Tagle and Mother Mila blowing cake, video

Mrs. Milagros Gokim-Tagle (in red) helped Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle of Manila blow the candle on his cake on June 21, 2012, his first birthday anniversary after being appointed archbishop of Manila. - NJ Viehland Photos

Mrs. Milagros Gokim-Tagle (in red) helped Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle of Manila blow the candle on his cake on June 21, 2012, his first birthday anniversary after being appointed archbishop of Manila. – NJ Viehland Photo

What did it take for a woman to raise a son like Luis Antonio Tagle, now cardinal of Manila?
What was the role of Milagros Gokim-Tagle in the growth of her son’s priestly vocation?
How did she support him and what role does she play now that he is a bishop?

Milagros Tagle, “Nanay Mila” to family, friends and the public, spoke to Family Rosary Crusade TV’s “Church Alive” program about what it is like to be a bishop’s mother. The video was recorded two years before Pope Benedict XVI appointed Cardinal Tagle, then bishop of his home Diocese of Imus, Cavite, south of Manila, as Archbishop of Manila in 2011 and three years before the pope created him a cardinal in the Nov. 2012 consistory in Rome.

Speaking her own views in Tagalog, “Nanay” (mother) Mila talked about Cardinal Tagle’s wish to be a doctor, and how her sibling who was a doctor turned over to the Cardinal his medical books in case they would prove useful to him.Â

However, his priest friends accompanied him to take the entrance test in the Jesuit Ateneo University, and he passed.
His mother told Church Alive program  with her son already a bishop, he still follows their advice on certain personal matters  especially regarding care for his health.

She said as a bishop, her son does not dictate to her. He advises on people approaching them to bring matters to the cardinal.
“We advise people to write a letter and give to his (cardinal’s) secretary. Everything goes through his secretary,” Nanay Mila said.

Concerning her role as Cardinal Tagle’s mother, she sees this as just a way that God is using her as instrument of his will.
“It’s just like Jesus. Mary did not know that the child she was going to give birth to is the son of God,” the bishop’s mother said.

The slogan popularized by Congregation of Holy Cross Father Patrick Peyton, the Irish-born priest who started Family Crusade in the Phiippines, “The family that prays together stays together,” is this still relevant today?

Nanay Mila says even if they are separated, families could pray wherever they are. “It is my weapon. That is what I tell my fellow mothers and my friends who have changed religion. You don’t know, it’s a weapon? No matter where you go, you will be safe from harm.”

Nanay Mila as a mother would look in on her children when they went to bed and again in the morning before the get up. She believes mothers should be able to do the same to their children and laments that women have to go abroad to earn a living.

The summary is based on summary of unofficial translations of the interview.

View full Family Rosary TV video of the interview  with Nanay Mila in Tagalog.

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