Interview : Sr. Maria Añanita Borbon, RGS

by NJ Viehland

NJ Viehland Photos

Sr. Maria Añanita Borbon [right] works with Sr. Ailyn Binco in overseeing and coordinating the varied ministries of Religious of the Good Shepherd Philippines – NJ Viehland Photos

QUEZON CITY, Philippines – Nuns of the Religious of the Good Shepherd in the Philippines are multi-tasking as their congregation’s members engaged in apostolic work grow fewer and older.

Sr. Maria Añanita Borbon, 47, for example, heads the Philippine Province’s Council for Ministry and coordinates its Ruhama Center for girls and women.

In an interview for Global Sisters’ Report (GSR) on Nov. 9, Sr. Borbon described the demands of her assignments. These have failed to overwhelm her, she says, because she has done most of the tasks she faces and past experiences left a rewarding feeling. 

She also counts on learnings from studying for her Masters in Educational Administration at the Ateneo de Manila University and PhD in Educational Leadership and Management at De La Salle University. In the end, Sr. Borbon says, engaging with people, especially young students while  juggling her time between assignments often leaves her feeling “energized.”

As part of the RGS charism, Sr. Borbon felt called upon to revive a program for exploited women after its internationally recognized founder and head, Sister Mary Soledad “Sr. Sol” Perpinan, passed away in 2011. Sr Perpinan had established a network of centers helping women even after rheumatoid arthritis bound her to a wheelchair. 

Saint Mary Euphrasia Pelletier founded RGS in Angers, France, in 1835 just after the French Revolution to help “morally endangered women and girls.” 

Read more on RGS history

contributed by Ed Gerlock

Women call out to people outside the nightclub where they work in Malate, Manila – contributed by Ed Gerlock edgerlock@yahoo.com.ph

The first RGS sisters who arrived in the Philippines in 1912 were Irish nuns sent by boat from Burma (Myanmar) in response to the invitation of the bishop of Lipa in Batangas Province, 51.6 miles (83 kilometers) southeast of Manila. Under RGS sisters in France, Philippines nuns ran schools and ministries in many parts of the country.

After opening a school in Batangas, the nuns established their first Good Shepherd home for endangered women and girls in Manila in 1921. They later opened homes for unwed mothers, prostituted women, battered women, slum dwellers, landless farmers, indigenous groups, overseas contract workers and their families, street children, “the most neglected and oppressed.” The Philippines province was established in 1960. 

Today RGS has grown to be one of the world’s biggest congregations of women with more than 4,000 sisters serving in 73 countries in five continents. On its centennial in 2012 the Philippines Province reported it was running 27 apostolic and contemplative communities in the country. More than 140 apostolic sisters and 25 contemplative sisters were serving in the Philippines.

In 2002 there were a total of 183 Filipino apostolic and contemplative sisters, the Catholic Directory of the Philippines reported. 

Read Part 1 of Q & A with Sr. Borbon published in GSR

Part 2

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Philippines called to lead campaign against the death penalty in Asia

Cities for Life rally "No justice without life", Oct. 28, 2014, Greenfields Square, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Cities for Life rally “No justice without life”, Oct. 28, 2014, Greenfields Square, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Egidio anti death penalty rally singers NJ Viehland

Hundreds of people who gathered at a public square here for a rally against the death penalty lit candles and joined in singing “Heal the World” to close a historic dialogue on human rights and respect for the dignity of life.

It may have ended months of work for the first Asia Pacific dialogue on the theme “No Justice without Life.” But Mayor Benjamin Abalos Jr. and other speakers pointed out that much work remains for Filipinos to foster dialogue on the death penalty and ensure that the country’s laws do not again allow executions.

"No justice without life" Oct. 27, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

“No justice without life” Oct. 27, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Mayor Benjamin "Benhur" Abalos, Jr of Mandaluyong on the Global Campaign Cities for Life where his city is member at the anti death penalty rally Oct. 28, 2014 in Greenfields Square / NJ Viehland Photos

Mayor Benjamin “Benhur” Abalos, Jr of Mandaluyong on the Global Campaign Cities for Life where his city is member at the anti death penalty rally Oct. 28, 2014 in Greenfields Square / NJ Viehland Photos

Religions and the value of life symposium [l-r] Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo of Manila, CBCP Committee on Public Affairs Chair, Grace Candol of Sant'Egidio Philippines, Abdulhusin Kashim, Former Dean and lecturer of Islam, Oct. 27, 2014 / NJ Viehland Photos

Religions and the value of life symposium [l-r] Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo of Manila, CBCP Committee on Public Affairs Chair, Grace Candol of Sant’Egidio Philippines, Abdulhusin Kashim, Former Dean and lecturer of Islam, Oct. 27, 2014 / NJ Viehland Photos

Read full report  / Scroll down for photos

Aux. Bishop Broderick Pabillo of Manila, Chairman, CBCP Permanent Committee on Public Affairs, Oct. 27, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Aux. Bishop Broderick Pabillo of Manila, Chairman, CBCP Permanent Committee on Public Affairs, Oct. 27, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Religions and the value of life symposium [l-r] Buddhist Monk Ryuji Furukawa of Japan Schweitzer Temple, Chair Sudheendra Kulkarni of observer Research Foundation in Mumbai, India, Oct. 27, 2014, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Religions and the value of life symposium [l-r] Buddhist Monk Ryuji Furukawa of Japan Schweitzer Temple, Chair Sudheendra Kulkarni of observer Research Foundation in Mumbai, India, Oct. 27, 2014, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Global Campaign for Abolition of the Death Penalty, Mario Marazziti, President of Commission for Human Rights of the Italian Parliament and co-founder World Coalition Against Death Penalty, Italy, Oct. 27, 2014, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Global Campaign for Abolition of the Death Penalty, Mario Marazziti, President of Commission for Human Rights of the Italian Parliament and co-founder World Coalition Against Death Penalty, Italy, Oct. 27, 2014, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

A Culture for Life in the Philippines, Justice Secretary Leila de Lima, Oct. 27, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

A Culture for Life in the Philippines, Justice Secretary Leila de Lima, Oct. 27, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Cambodia Justice Secretary Sotheavy Chan, Oct. 27, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Cambodia Justice Secretary Sotheavy Chan, Oct. 27, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Lorenzo "Erin" Tanada III, Former Deputy Speaker, Phil. House of Representatives, Oct. 28, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Lorenzo “Erin” Tanada III, Former Deputy Speaker, Phil. House of Representatives, Oct. 28, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Arthur Laffin, founder of Murder Victims' Family for Reconciliation, USA talked about moving on after his brother's murder, Oct. 27, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Arthur Laffin, founder of Murder Victims’ Family for Reconciliation, USA talked about moving on after his brother’s murder, Oct. 27, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Alberto Quattrucci [rigtmost] with Sant'Egidio team, 1st Asia Pacific Dialogue on Human Rights and Respect for the Dignity of Life, Oct. 28, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Alberto Quattrucci [rigtmost] with Sant’Egidio team, 1st Asia Pacific Dialogue on Human Rights and Respect for the Dignity of Life, Oct. 28, 2014, Shangri-La Plaza Hotel, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

JC Mangmang [rightmost] and fellow freshmen of Don Bosco electronic communication / NJ Viehland Photos

JC Mangmang [rightmost] and fellow freshmen of Don Bosco electronic communication / NJ Viehland Photos

Cities for Life rally vs death penalty, Greenfields Square, Mandaluyong City, Philippines, Oct. 28, 2014 / NJ Viehland Photos

Cities for Life rally vs death penalty, Greenfields Square, Mandaluyong City, Philippines, Oct. 28, 2014 / NJ Viehland Photos

Justice Secretary Leila De Lima, Cities of Life rally "no justice without life" Oct. 28, 2014, Greenfields Square, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

Justice Secretary Leila De Lima, Cities of Life rally “no justice without life” Oct. 28, 2014, Greenfields Square, Mandaluyong City, Philippines / NJ Viehland Photos

USA Ridgefield Town Police Commissioner George Kain, Professor, Division of Justice and law Administration at Greenfields Square, Mandaluyong City, Philippines Cities of Life rally vs death penalty, Oct. 28, 2014 / NJ Viehland Photos

USA Ridgefield Town Police Commissioner George Kain, Professor, Division of Justice and law Administration at Greenfields Square, Mandaluyong City, Philippines Cities of Life rally vs death penalty, Oct. 28, 2014 / NJ Viehland Photos

 

“No justice without life”conference vs death penalty steps outside Italy

 

[l-r] Leonardo Tranggono of Sant'Egidio, Italian Ambassador to the Philippines Massimo Roscigno, Philippines Secretary Leila De Lima, Philippines Justice Undersecretary Francisco Baraan III, Administrator Manuel Co of Parole and Probation Administration announce the first "No justice without life" Conference in Asia at the Oct. 23 press conference at the Department of Justice, Manila/ NJ Viehland Photos

[l-r] Leonardo Tranggono of Sant’Egidio, Italian Ambassador to the Philippines Massimo Roscigno, Philippines Secretary Leila De Lima, Philippines Justice Undersecretary Francisco Baraan III, Administrator Manuel Co of Parole and Probation Administration announce the first “No justice without life” Conference in Asia at the Oct. 23 press conference at the Department of Justice, Manila/ NJ Viehland Photos

Rome-based international Christian Community of Sant’Egidio and the Philippines Department of Justice (DOJ) welcomed delegates to the October 27-28 conference on the death penalty that will be held in Mandaluyong City, east of Manila.

Philippines Justice Secretary Leila De Lima announced the “Asia-Pacific Congress on human rights, respect of human life, abolition of death penalty,”  and introduced her department’s co-organizers during a press conference conducted Oct. 23 at the DOJ in Manila as delegates arrived. 

On Monday, representatives of Asian governments, activists and witnesses from Asian countries and more than 30 mayors from around the Philippines will gather  there for two days to listen to and dialogue on issues and points tackled in talks concerning human rights, respect for life, abolition of every kind of death penalty in Asia. 

Countries expected to send representatives include India, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos, Indonesia. The Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines is also sending representatives from its commission on prison pastoral care.

 Leonardo Tranggono who serves in Sant’Egidio’s international affairs office told Catholic in Asia this is the first time the annual gathering launched in 2005 is being held outside Italy. Asia was selected primarily because majority of governments in the region still impose capital punishment, Tranggono said.

Tranggono and Italian Ambassador to the Philippines Massimo Roscigno thanked De Lima for accepting the invitation to host the “historic” conference and for the Philippine government’s “advocacy” for halting executions of persons. 

President Gloria Arroyo approved in 2006 the law abolishing death penalty in the Philippines.

This week’s conference host, Mandaluyong City, has also declared its opposition to the death penalty, along with more than 2,000 “Cities for Life” in some 50 countries, Tranggono said.

End of Part I       

Hong Kong Cardinal Tong appeals to SAR gov’t, protesters – Document

Cardinal John Tong of Hong Kong has appealed to the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) government to exercise restraint on the second day of Occupy Central protests after police sprayed tear gas on people who had massed up in Hong Kong’s Central district and surrounding neighborhoods for the civil disobedience movement. 

Cardinal Tong also appealed to the tens of thousands of protesters, including young students, to keep calm, as he urged Christians to pray for peaceful reconciliation of the conflicting parties in the protests. 

Earlier on Monday, Assistant Commissioner of Police Cheung Tak-Keung told a press conference that around 41 people, including 12 police were injured when protesters charged through police cordon lines yesterday in what media called the “Umbrella Revolution” because people carried umbrellas for protection against tear gas.

Cheung said police warned oncoming protesters and gave them time to comply with orders. He said police used tear gas 87 times in nine locations yesterday. They also resorted to using pepper spray and batons to keep their distance and prevent injuries, the commissioner said. He said police used “minimum force.”

By paralyzing Hong Kong’s financial hub, Occupy Centeral with Love and Peace protests aim to press for democratic change, mainly in allowing citizens to freely choose their top leaders.

Media around the world have been following the protests since they began on Sunday.

 

 

Hong Kong Cardinal John Tong appeals for Hong Kong-SAR government restrain and calm from protesters - Hong Kong Church Document

Hong Kong Cardinal John Tong appeals for Hong Kong-SAR government restrain and calm from protesters – Hong Kong Church Document

Hong Kong Cardinal John Tong appeals for Hong Kong-SAR government restraint and calm from protesters - Hong Kong Church Document

Hong Kong Cardinal John Tong appeals for Hong Kong-SAR government restraint and calm from protesters – Hong Kong Church Document

Wish for Pope Francis’ visit to Madhu to reconcile Church and nation

Screen shot of the logo of Pope Francis' January 12-15 visit to Sri Lanka 2015 discussed on the website of the Archdiocese of Colombo http://www.archdioceseofcolombo.com/inner.php?news_id=369

Screen shot of the logo of Pope Francis’ January 12-15 visit to Sri Lanka 2015 discussed on the website of the Archdiocese of Colombo http://www.archdioceseofcolombo.com/inner.php?news_id=369

The reported visit of Pope Francis to the Shrine of Madhu in Northern Sri Lanka in January is seen as a logistical challenge,  an opportunity for the charismatic head of the Catholic Church to raise awareness of the plight of victims of the 26-year civil war in the country that ended in 2009, and a way to ease tension in a divided Church and nation.

The supposed planned visit revealed earlier this month by Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith of Colombo, president of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Sri Lanka, awaits the Vatican’s official announcement.

Italian La Stampa newspaper’s Vatican Insider website discusses Cardinal Malcom’s announcement of the visit to the Marian Shrine, logistical problems surrounding such a journey and its significance to resolving division among Sri Lanka clergy and Church members as well as to people’s quest for national reconciliation.

More on this in Sri Lanka: Pope Francis will go among the Tamils

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Sri Lanka’s Buddhist-Muslim clashes reveal the evil of politicising religion, Hector Welgampola
Ruki Fernando out of detention – is he free? – Interview
 
 

Pope Francis to visit Madhu Shrine, spend time with war victims, orphans? – Sri Lanka web news

Archdiocese of Colombo website photo

screenshot – Archdiocese of Colombo website photo

Pope Francis would visit the historical Madhu Shrine during his stay in Sri Lanka in January next year, Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith, the Archbishop of Colombo reportedly announced in Madhu.

The Pope will arrive in Sri Lanka on the 13th of January 2015, and celebrate mass at the Galle Face Green on the 14th morning before heading to Mannar District in Sri Lanka’s Northern Province, reported EyeSriLanka online newspaper.

The Shrine of Our Lady of Madhu in the district of Mannar is considered one the holiest Catholic shrine in Sri Lanka, and is a place of worship for both the Sinhalese and the Tamils and has been considered a symbol of unity between the two communities.

Bishop Rayappu Joseph, said Pope Francis would visit the Madhu shrine during his January visit and bless the war victims at a special mass at the shrine.

Bishop Joseph along with Cardinal Ranjith blessed thousands of pilgrims who gathered there from various parts of the island for the August festival last Friday, Aug. 15 . 

“Pope Francis will be the first Pope to travel out of Colombo,” Bishop Joseph is quoted saying. The Pope is expected to interact with the war widows, disabled persons and orphans, he added.

Read EyeSriLanka report

Related posts

Concern about Pope Francis’ Sri Lanka visit mounts with militant climate vs. religious minorities
Sri Lanka’s Buddhist-Muslim clashes reveal the evil of politicising religion, Hector Welgampola
What can Asia expect of upcoming papal visits?
Ruki Fernando out of detention – is he free?

Sri Lanka Court stops deportation of Pakistanis

[updated Aug. 16, 11:41 p.m.]

Sri Lanka’s Court of Appeal has ordered the suspension of deporting Pakistani asylum seekers back to their country, until  August 29, Colombo Gazette reported.

 Most asylum seekers from Pakistan belong to religious minorities – including Ahmadiyya Muslim, Christian and Shia – who are often discriminated against and subjected to violent attacks, UN Special Rapporteur on minority issues, Rita Izsák, is quoted telling the Gazette.

The asylum seekers flee their country in South Asia along the Arabian Sea and the Gulf of Oman, and head southeast beyond India to the island country of Sri Lanka. 

Last year, 687 persons belonging to religious minorities were reported killed in over 200 attacks in Pakistan. 

However, Sri Lanka government reportedly deports them despite being registered with United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and having their first instance interviews still pending.

Read the full report on the court decision here 

Refugees from Pakistan reportedly obtain a 30-day tourist visa to Sri Lanka online and stay on after registering with UNHCR, which reviews their case.

 The Sri Lankan government says the Pakistanis are part of an influx of economic immigrants in the past year who have become a burden on the country’s resources and potentially compromised state and regional security.

Receiving no help from Sri Lanka’s  government, Pakistani families are driven to seek aid from the Catholic church or a mosque in the area.

Various human rights activists have written about the plight of asylum seekers in Pakistan and in Sri Lanka.

Earlier this week, Sri Lankan human rights activist Ruki Fernando decried his government’s “inhumane” response to asylum seekers and shared his personal experiences with Pakistani families in Sri Lanka.

Aside from the government, people in Sri Lanka who support repatriation of these asylum seekers “are just as deplorable,” the Catholic human rights defender added.

Read the full text of Fernando’s commentary posted on Ground Views citizen journalist blog site.

Fernando is a Sri Lankan human rights activist who participated in the protective fellowship scheme at University of York’s Center for Applied Human Rights in 2012-2013. He has been involved in international advocacy and protection of human rights defenders who are facing risk, and worked on issues such as freedom of expression and enforced disappearances.